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Fountain of Fwoosh article Frequency - The Snowboarders Journal

Last winter season my good friend and writer Tyler Austin Bradley aka TAB wanted to venture with Splitboards and a crew of friends into an old mining area close to New Denver, BC. To write an article for the Snowboarders Journal. On the first evening we lapped the Summit lake ski resort with very slushy snow and everybody got a little concerned if we would find the highly sought after dry powdery snow. But after a few Beers on the tailgate the hopes for the next days adventure where high. Next morning we left the vehicles in an abandoned mining town and skinned past old mining sheds, sketchy adits, old core sample piles and ofcourse rusty piles of metal sticking out of the snow. With every step higher the snow became more fluffy and deeper, to punch in the skin track was more exhausting then anticipated because of the deep snow. Thick old Douglas firs and Hemlocks accompanied us up the hillside, steeper and steeper the terrain became until we stepped over a rocky edge and a beautiful bowl opened up in front of us. For the first time we saw our final destination a ridge line high above us, but with the sun in our faces we scaled it swiftly. On the ridge the vast landscape of the of the Selkirk Range unfolded completely, peak after peak and empty valleys carpeted with dense forest. Dream material for every adventure thirsty soul, we flew down the slope with out effort but with snow dust in our faces. After the sun fell behind the horizon, we drifted in the comforting waters of a local hot spring dreaming of the lines the next day would bring.

Back home I sketched some illustrations for this article trying to capture the other worldly atmosphere, we encountered up there in the Selkirks. Where only the chirping Chikadees broke the silence. Almost a year later I found the Journal squeezed amongst other magazines in the grocery store. Reading through the article made my legs itch and I want to climb more ridge lines again. 

Lars Baggenstos